Free Trade Agreement Feta Cheese

December 9th, 2020

Free Trade Agreement Feta Cheese

Spanish farmers have called Mexican cheese “insipid” and “false name” and were outraged by the final agreement which, as part of a compromise, allows both sides to continue using their names until consumers believe mexican cheese is Spanish or sheep. But that could not be the end of the anger: Mexico`s agreement on the protection of certain EU cheese names could hurt US cheese exports to the neighbouring country, the US dairy industry has warned. But Washington and American farmers argue that “feta” is a generic term that covers a food category, and that no reasonable person thinks they are buying Greek cheese when they buy a cheese labelled “feta” in the United States. The same issue has appeared in the ongoing trade negotiations between the EU and Australia, according to Aussie media, and the issue is far from complete, with some signs that a perhaps more limited trade agreement between the US and the EU is imminent. Italian cheesemakers wanted to protect the name Parmesan, but the EU does not want it. Instead, it will try to prevent Australia from using the term Parmigiano Reggiano. The EU is so determined to ensure that only the Greek feta can legally qualify as a feta, that it has even made it a sensitive point in trade negotiations with the United States. In addition, other recent EU free trade agreements offered a number of exceptions to the ban. For example, the EU-Canada INTER agreement explicitly provides exceptions for the use of translations that are the common names of products (even if the corresponding IC is mentioned). In addition, the agreement contains specific variants or translations of unprotected denominations, such as Parmesan or Tiroler Speck, if this does not mislead the consumer as to the true origin. “I look forward to the EU appointing the next Trade Commissioner as soon as it ends and continuing to work with that person to hopefully conclude this agreement as soon as possible, ideally next year. Trade Minister Simon Birmingham has published a list of 172 food products and 236 spirits that the European Union (EU) intends to protect in exchange for a free trade agreement with Australia.

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