S.a.l.t Agreement

December 16th, 2020

S.a.l.t Agreement

Negotiations continued from November 17, 1969 to May 1972, in a series of meetings that began in Helsinki, with the U.S. delegation led by Gerard C. Smith, Director of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency. The following meetings took place between Vienna and Helsinki. After a long deadlock, the first results of SALT I arrived in May 1971, when an agreement was reached on the ABM systems. Further talks ended negotiations on 26 May 1972 in Moscow, when Richard Nixon and Leonid Brezhnev signed both the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty and the Interim Agreement between the United States of America and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics on certain measures to limit strategic offensive weapons. [5] At the Vladivostok Summit in November 1974, Ford and Brezhnev agreed on the basic framework for a SALT II agreement. This was a ceiling of 2,400 for strategic nuclear delivery vehicles (ICBMs, SLBMs and heavy bombers) for each side; A limit of 1,320 for MIRV systems; banning new land-based ICBM launchers; And limits to the use of new types of strategic offensive weapons. Even after the Vladivostok agreements, the two nations were unable to resolve the other two outstanding issues of SALT I: the number of strategic bombers and the total number of warheads in each nation`s arsenal.

The first was made more difficult by the Soviet Bomber Backfire, which American negotiators thought could reach the United States, but which the Soviets did not want to include in the SALT negotiations. Meanwhile, the Soviets tried unsuccessfully to limit the American use of cruise air missiles (ALCMs). The audit also divided the two nations, but they eventually agreed on the use of National Technical Means (NTM), including the collection of electronic signals known as telemetry and the use of photo recognition satellites. On June 17, 1979, Carter and Brezhnev signed the SALT II Treaty in Vienna. Salt II limited the total number of nuclear forces from both countries to 2,250 delivery vehicles and imposed numerous additional restrictions on core strategic forces, including MIRVs. Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT), negotiations between the United States and the Soviet Union to limit the manufacture of strategic missiles capable of carrying nuclear weapons. The first agreements, known as SALT I and SALT II, were signed in 1972 and 1979 by the United States and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and aimed to limit the arms race of strategic (long-range or intercontinental) nuclear-armed ballistic missiles. For the first time proposed by U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1967, strategic arms limitation talks were agreed by the two superpowers in the summer of 1968, and in November 1969 comprehensive negotiations began.

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